WSNYC Blog: The Latest in Employment Law

Mr. Christopher Davis specializes in employment-related trial matters and class actions on behalf of both employers and employees. During his career, Mr. Davis has served as class counsel on numerous nationwide employment class actions and has tried nearly 20 cases to verdict. Mr. Davis has been recognized by the press as an experienced trial attorney and employment law expert. He is regularly interviewed by print and television media outlets around the world, including The Associated Press, The Shriver Report, and CNN En Español. Mr. Davis began his career as an Assistant District Attorney in the esteemed Manhattan District Attorneys’ office under then-District Attorney Robert Morgenthau. After winning numerous trials, he was appointed to the Sex Crimes Unit where he prosecuted and tried serious violent felonies, including rape and attempted murder cases. In private practice since 2006, Mr. Davis has worked for numerous employment law firms, including Thompson, Wigdor & Gilly, LLP (now Wigdor LLP), before starting his own law firm in 2014. Mr. Davis holds a Bachelor of Arts from the College of the Holy Cross, where he received Dean’s List Honors, and a Juris Doctor from Catholic University’s Columbus School of Law.

The Law Office of Christopher Q. Davis is a nationally recognized New York employment law firm specializing in preventing, prosecuting, and defending employment lawsuits on behalf of businesses with real workplace problems. We pride ourselves on backing our clients with a sense of loyalty and purpose, and our successes are the result of the strong relationships we build with them. Tell us your workplace problems and we will find your win.

Latest from WSNYC Blog: The Latest in Employment Law - Page 2

         Amira Donahue, 16 years old, works as a hostess at Olive Garden in Evansville, Indiana. Amira was serving a table during a normal Saturday night dinner rush when something horrible happened. Her table asked Amira for hot water, and immediately after, the customers bursted into a racist tirade. The table publicly expressed that they preferred a white server over Amira, who is African American. The manager complied with the customers’ request and reassigned a new white server to the table. Afterwards, one woman at the table made comments about Amira to one of Amira’s coworkers. Amira later recounted to…
Too often, large employers violate the workplace rights of flat rate contract drivers. The good news is that these drivers are winning lawsuits around the country to get back their rightfully earned wages. If you are a flat rate contract driver, keep reading to learn how you can protect your rights now so that you may have a more successful lawsuit in the future.  1. Keep Your Receipts Keep all of your receipts for any work-related expenses. Flat rate contract drivers often use their own vehicles for work, which can result in these types of costs. For example, common expenses…
Great Hearts Western Hills, a public charter school in San Antonio, Texas, faced intense criticism after firing an employee for wearing a Black Lives Matter face mask to work. According to a CNN article, Lillian White, an art teacher at the school, lost her job for wearing a face mask that displayed “Silence is Violence” and “Black Lives Matter” messages across the front.  Considering the current social movement surrounding racial issues in the country, White explained that she wanted to show her support for her Black students and fellow faculty members. The school, however, had a different reaction than White…
Anthony Jefferson was shopping at On the Road Automotive Group, a car dealership in the Bronx, to buy his wife a car for her birthday when something horrific happened. Three armed suspects fired several shots into the car dealership. Jefferson quickly shielded his children, aged six, five, and two, from the bullets with his body. While protecting his children, Jefferson was shot three times in the legs. None of Jefferson’s children were injured due to his heroism. The NYPD is still searching for the perpetrators of this shooting. The NYPD said that after the shooting, the suspects stole a green…
In an article published in The Washington Post, Apple, a multinational technology company, was accused of wage and labor violations in Chinese factories. A non-profit advocacy group named China Labor Watch accused Apple of the labor violations, “including withholding bonus payments, rolling back safety training and employing more temporary workers than China’s laws allow.” According to the article, these reports were found after investigators worked undercover at the biggest iPhone factory in Zhengzhou, China. Unfortunately, this instance is not the first time Apple was accused of infringing its international workers’ rights. Just two years ago, workers from Suquian, China…
During times of economic recession, both unemployment and wage theft rates rise. Wage theft occurs when an employer refuses to compensate an employee the rightful amount for time worked. Examples of wage theft are paying someone less than minimum wage, or promising an amount of money and paying only half of that amount. Statistically speaking, industries such as construction, retail, food service, and domestic work have the highest amount of wage theft cases. As the pandemic progresses, less money flows into these industries and employers feel  pressured to make ends meet. One way to edge out their competition is to…
The deaths of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, among many others at the hands of police, have motivated a series of social change. More people have become aware of injustices and inequalities that exist within the country and have become more conscious, vocal, and active agents of change. Conversations that would normally be seen as “uncomfortable” are now encouraged in the workplace, in schools, and even in professional sports. This social change has prompted individuals to become more involved in social justice issues. From NBA players kneeling before the start of their games, to protests that have been taking place…
Arbitration is a private form of dispute resolution where conflicting parties choose a third party to resolve a dispute. Rather than filing a lawsuit in court, parties in arbitration privately resolve a conflict behind closed doors. Employers first created this process to lower legal costs and hold disputes in a venue that might be more sympathetic to them. For example, some employers think that arbitrators, who may be retired judges or business people, are more impartial than typical jurors and less likely to be influenced by emotion in rendering a decision. Is Arbitration Employers’ Frankenstein? In Mary Shelley’s classic novel,…