WSNYC Blog: The Latest in Employment Law

Mr. Christopher Davis specializes in employment-related trial matters and class actions on behalf of both employers and employees. During his career, Mr. Davis has served as class counsel on numerous nationwide employment class actions and has tried nearly 20 cases to verdict. Mr. Davis has been recognized by the press as an experienced trial attorney and employment law expert. He is regularly interviewed by print and television media outlets around the world, including The Associated Press, The Shriver Report, and CNN En Español. Mr. Davis began his career as an Assistant District Attorney in the esteemed Manhattan District Attorneys’ office under then-District Attorney Robert Morgenthau. After winning numerous trials, he was appointed to the Sex Crimes Unit where he prosecuted and tried serious violent felonies, including rape and attempted murder cases. In private practice since 2006, Mr. Davis has worked for numerous employment law firms, including Thompson, Wigdor & Gilly, LLP (now Wigdor LLP), before starting his own law firm in 2014. Mr. Davis holds a Bachelor of Arts from the College of the Holy Cross, where he received Dean’s List Honors, and a Juris Doctor from Catholic University’s Columbus School of Law.

The Law Office of Christopher Q. Davis is a nationally recognized New York employment law firm specializing in preventing, prosecuting, and defending employment lawsuits on behalf of businesses with real workplace problems. We pride ourselves on backing our clients with a sense of loyalty and purpose, and our successes are the result of the strong relationships we build with them. Tell us your workplace problems and we will find your win.

Latest from WSNYC Blog: The Latest in Employment Law - Page 2

A former analyst for BlackRock, Inc., the world’s largest asset manager, has alleged discrimination in the workplace. Essma Bengabsia was one of the few hijab-wearing women on the New York trading floor. She now alleges workplace harassment on the basis of her religion, race, and sex. When she first started at BlackRock, Bengabsia described that she “was thrilled to break a glass ceiling and chart into new frontiers on behalf of marginalized and underrepresented communities.” However, she claims this excitement did not last for long after she began to experience discrimination in the workplace.  Analyst Claims Islamophobia on Wall…
Last month, Bonnie Jacobson, a waitress at Red Hook Tavernin Brooklyn, New York, was fired for refusing to take the Covid-19 vaccine. In an interview with NBC News, Jacobson shared her hesitations in receiving the vaccine, including inadequate research about “the vaccine, fertility, and pregnancy.” She also stated she was not permanently against getting the vaccine but rather, preferred to wait for more conclusive research on the vaccine’s effects on fertility. According to an article published on 1010 Wins, Jacobson sent an email to management expressing her concerns about the vaccine, including her and her husband’s plans to…
Last month, the governor of New Jersey passed A21, the “New Jersey Cannabis Regulatory, Enforcement Assistance, and Marketplace Modernization Act” (NJCREAMMA). According to a JD Supra article, this act is “enabling legislation for the amendment to the New Jersey Constitution making lawful the recreational use of marijuana in the state.” Our firm’s previous blog on the topic explains more about the interplay between state and local marijuana laws. Despite the passage of this new law, there are still regulations regarding the use and presence of marijuana in the workplace. For example, the law stipulates that employers can choose…
The Senate recently passed a $1.9 trillion pandemic relief package brought forth by Democrats. The bill passed 50-49 after an overnight voting session and will now head to the House for final passage. Democrats say this bill is part of their “America Rescue Plan” and will help get Americans and the economy back on track. Many Republicans have criticized the bill, saying it is much more expensive than necessary. They have also pointed to previous legislation passed since the pandemic began that totals about $4 trillion in spending. The new bill provides relief in many areas, including aid to schools…
  Buckingham Palace announced this week that it will conduct an investigation into allegations of bullying in its workplace. Employees of the British royal family claim that Meghan Markle, the Duchess of Sussex and wife of Prince Harry, bullied royal staff in 2018. The palace stated that it “does not and will not tolerate bullying or harassment” and is “very concerned” about the allegations. Palace Employees Accuse Meghan Markle of Bullying A former Palace communications officer released an email complaint in The Times. Two personal assistants claimed Markle drove them out of their jobs after bullying them in the…
It’s never a good idea to talk poorly about your friends or colleagues, but one should never do so over text or email in the workplace. There have been several instances in which employees have faced disciplinary action for unprofessionalism in the workplace based on comments shared over text or email. Here are five reasons why our firm urges all employees to avoid making rude or derogatory comments over text or email.  It’s rude and unprofessional.  This goes without saying; speaking poorly about your colleagues is not right and is certainly bad for the company. Even if others agree with…
On January 22, 2021, the New York Mets quietly dismissed their hitting performance coordinator, Ryan Ellis, due to sexual harassment allegations. Ellis’s dismissal followed the firing of Jared Porter, the general manager of the Mets, on January 19th because Porter admitted to sending inappropriate text messages to a reporter while working for the Cubs, as well as overall inappropriate behavior. The Mets sexual harassment saga continued when Mickey Calloway, the former manager of the Mets, was dismissed due to allegations from 5 different women. Ellis was promoted from his minor league position last season after the former major league…
Earlier this week, New York’s attorney general filed a lawsuit against the world’s largest online retailer, Amazon Inc., for mishandling worker safety during the Covid-19 pandemic. This lawsuit is not the first time Amazon has faced criticism for not providing a safe working environment for its employees. In 2020, workers filed several complaints against the company, including a petition signed by 600 employees  that urged the online retailer giant to improve working conditions. Attorney general, Letitia James, filed the complaint in the state Supreme Court asserting that Amazon has “repeatedly and persistently failed to comply with its obligation to…
Earlier this month, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced that Amazon will pay $61.7 million to settle allegations that the company stole Amazon Flex drivers’ tips for two and a half years. The FTC says this number represents the amount of tip money that Amazon did not give to drivers until the company became aware of the FTC investigation in 2019. FTC Commissioner Rohit Chopra said, “Today, the FTC is sanctioning Amazon.com for expanding its business empire by cheating its workers. Amazon stole nearly one-third of drivers’ tips to pad its own bottom line.” Flex drivers are independent contractors, meaning…
A new study in the American Economic Journal of Economic Policy concluded that working mothers who took paid maternity leave had better long-term health outcomes compared to women who did not have paid maternity leave. Researchers studied pregnant workers in Norway both before and after paid maternity leave became the law of the land in 1977. The study found that women who gave birth after 1977 had better health outcomes in middle age than women who did not have paid maternity leave. Health Benefits of Paid Maternity Leave Researchers found that women who had paid maternity leave earlier in life…
In the past few years, the Department of Labor (DOL) launched an investigation into pay disparities affecting female and Asian employees working at Google. The agency found that these disparities impacted software engineering employees working in Mountain View, California; Seattle, Washington; and Kirkland, Washington. The investigators discovered the pay gap during a routine compliance evaluation. Additionally, the DOL identified hiring differences that disadvantaged female and Asian applicants for software engineering employees in specific locations. As a result of the DOL case against them, Google has agreed to pay over $3.8 million to settle allegations of systemic gender and race discrimination…
Instacart has terminated ten employees working at a grocery store in Illinois who voted to form the first and only union for the grocery delivery company in early 2020. The workers unionized with The United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) Local 1546. The news of their termination was “buried” in a blog post the company published in January about introducing new curbside pickup models. The blog also informed readers about further layoffs of in-store shoppers. According to the UFCW, Instacart plans to fire 2,000 of its 10,000 workers and offer only $250 of severance pay. Marc Perrone, president of UFCW…
  PricewaterhouseCoopers, a large accounting firm, reached a nearly $12 million settlement deal last month over age discrimination allegations. The lawsuit began when Steven Rabin, who was 50 years old, claimed he was wrongly denied a job because of his age. In March 2019, a federal judge conditionally certified a collective action of roughly 5,000 other individuals who also allegedly experienced age discrimination. After this certification, the parties began settlement negotiations and eventually reached a deal worth $11.6 million. Is On-Campus Hiring Age Discrimination? The attorneys for Rabin and the collective advanced a number of age discrimination theories. Firstly,…